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About Me

About Me:


Official PANK (Professional Aunt, No Kids) and pet mom to a too-smart-for-his-own-good cat, Charlie.  My wonderful husband and I split our time between Denver and NYC and love to travel.  Between two nephews, a mischievous cat, big city, mountains and new experiences, it's hard not to be inspired.

About the stories:


I was hanging out with one of my nephews during his "I only want to eat bananas" phase.  I was watching him stuff a banana into his tiny mouth, laboriously chew and finally swallow (which seemed to take about 5 minutes) when he looks up at me and says, "I want a banana".  I told him I thought he had enough for now and we began to have an interesting conversation which included the line, "Elephants don't eat bananas".  The wording stuck with me, and a story was born.  I came up with 3 other animal-based stories and put all of them into a sketch book, along with accompanying illustrations, as a special gift just for him.  Many stories followed after that, both for him and his younger brother when he was born.  I decided to post them here, as well as stories I am continually imagining, during the Coronavirus outbreak that caused all of us to socially isolate.  Knowing parents and kids are cooped up during this difficult time, I wanted to share (free of charge) stories that can help entertain the kids and hopefully manage to amuse the parents.  The effort also helps keep me occupied and sane :)

You can subscribe (again free-and of course I don't share information with outside parties) so you know when I add new stories.  If you like the stories, please feel free to share :)!

You can search the stories either by date or by tags (many of the stories are educational in nature, feature certain themes-like animals or space, are illustrated, or "just for fun"-which are usually unillustrated but fun, quick poems I think parents will appreciate as well.).  Some are inspired by Dr. Seuss, others more Shel Silverstein.  I hope your family enjoys them all!
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